Tag Archives: Teal

“But no matter how much evil I see, I think it’s important for everyone to understand that there is much more light than darkness.” ―Robert Uttaro

30 days of saamApril is Sexual Assault Awareness Month so today I want to kick off the month with this blog post. First, I want to invite everyone to participate in the 30 day challenge that the National Sexual Violence Resource Center has going on Instagram. To enter into the contest, you must have a public profile (unfortunately) so I won’t be considered for any prizes but I’m still going to post each day. For instance, today is April 1, so the prompt for today is “How I gear up for SAAM.” I posted a picture on Instagram of my planner with a single pen because my planner is how get ready for anything. Tomorrow is the day where we are supposed to wear teal, which is the ribbon color for sexual assault. I think it’s great because it’s also the ribbon color for PCOS, so I have more of a reason to celebrate the color teal.

SAAM19-FB2_0As a survivor of sexual assault, I want to spread the word about SAAM to everyone. They have special frames on Facebook for your profile picture to show your support, if you have Facebook. If you want to learn more information, visit here. Or if you want to donate to the cause, visit here. There is also a big conference in Chicago, IL if that’s more your thing, get info here. Lastly, visit here for resources.

I know this is short but comment below with what you are doing for SAAM this month. Until next time! Thank you for stopping by.

PS: This weekend is General Conference so be sure to tune in to that. Watch the video below for a great “trailer”  for it.

Advertisements

“Looking back, the biggest mistake I made was feeling ashamed of it. Acne is a part of life. You don’t need to be embarrassed of it.” -Cameron Dallas

The more I learn about PCOS the more I realize everything is connected. I love that I have answers to questions I’ve been asking for years. It doesn’t make me dislike my symptoms any less, though.

If you’ve ever been bullied, you understand where I’m coming from. You hate to be so different from everyone for fear of it happening again. Of course, I try to focus on what makes me happy and not what others think but it’s hard.

Having acne like I do at 26 is no fun. But what am I doing about it? Nothing. I wash my face every once in a while but not like I should. That’s what I want to talk about today, personal hygiene and PCOS.

There are so many articles out about what to use and what to avoid and it seems like they all contradict the other. One says to use something with peroxide while the other says to avoid it at all costs. Then there’s the research done on them that only makes it more confusing because the research constantly changes.

I was told in high school that eating carrots will clear acne right up. Is there research one it? You bet! Is it all accurate? Probably not. Another person said she was told to put toothpaste on every blemish. Now this one most people agree is not good for you. It’s harmful and they suggest trying something else.

Then you look at the face washes in the world and they all claim to be the best. For instance, Pro Active is suppose to be this miracle worker but it cause my cousin to break out worse. Then there’s the people that say if you’re not spending a lot of skin care, you’re just getting water and chemicals that won’t do anything.

Well, I’m right in the confusion with you. I have decided that I need to start trying to wash my face the right way. If I want to make my acne go away, I gotta try all I can right? We all have to start somewhere and for me, I’d like to start with the Cera Ve brand. It’s supposed to be dermatologist recommended so why not start there? I will probably get it this week and try it for a couple months and report back.

I know this was kind of all over the place, it’s just part of PCOS. If you struggle with acne, tell us below what helps you.

“Pain, you just have to fight through, because the truth is you can’t outrun it and life always makes more.” -Dr. Meredith Grey

pcosWith the month of September right around the corner, I wanted to post about something important to me. I’ve posted about it a couple of times before, and that’s PCOS. You can read those posts here and here.

For those who don’t know what it is or want to learn more about it, I will be making weekly posts about it. September is PCOS Awareness Month and I think what better way to bring awareness is through my blog?

This week I want to share about when I found out. I haven’t shared much about my thoughts and feelings on that day and why not kick it off with that?

It was last year, around this time actually. I was going in for a checkup to see what I could do about my acne because I was 25 and tired of it, I looked like a teenager and didn’t want to anymore. I went into the office, fully expecting her to look at my face and tell me to change my diet and take this specific medication. What I didn’t expect was to come out of that office with answers that I had been searching for for years. The doctor telling me “you are a textbook case of PCOS” still rings in my ear.

Of course, I didn’t want to take up any more of the doctor’s time and figured I could learn about it on my own. Big mistake, huge. I honestly didn’t know what to do with myself, the more I read that day, the worse I felt. It’s the leading cause of female infertility? So I may never have babies? It could lead to ovarian cancer? So I may get cancer?

Just an FYI, don’t just start researching on your own, it’s very overwhelming. I cried off and on for quite a while. And many people I talked to about it kind of just brushed it off like it was nothing. “so you’ll adopt, it’s fine.” or “you’re fine, nothing is wrong with you.” That one was probably my favorite because yes, there was something wrong with me.

I eventually gave up on telling people for a bit because I felt like I needed to just suffer on my own because no one really took it seriously. It’s an issue you can’t see so it must not be too bad, right? I hate that! I honestly hate that. But I didn’t make this post to rant about that, so let’s continue on with the story.

I was afraid and felt so alone. I didn’t know anyone who had been diagnosed with PCOS, I felt like the only one in the world who had it. Everyone I talked to never even knew what that was. So I don’t have a period every month, I should be thankful. That’s about the extent anyone knows. This is why PCOS Awareness Month exists. This is why I keep talking about it. This is why Buzzfeed did a video on it.

There’s so much I could say about my feelings of having PCOS. It is an emotional rollercoaster that I will never get off. There’s no cure and there may never be one. They’re barely starting to learn about what causes it so we still have a long way to go. But if you feel so inclined to donate, please do. You never know what your money could be helping accomplish.

As always, thank you for visiting my blog. I hope you keep returning to learn more about PCOS. And don’t forget to wear your teal in the month of September. I know I have my nail polish.

“You never know how strong you are until being strong is the only option you have left.” ―Ziad K. Abdelnour

A few months ago I went to the gynecologist only to come out with some shocking news. You never want to hear any statement that begins with “You have….” and continues on to say something that you have. Especially when it’s an incurable thing

I’ve always wondered if there was something there but someone always had an answer for my issues. I’ve wondered why I have never been menstruating regularly. “Oh, that’s normal.” Why did I started gaining weight so easily after puberty and haven’t been able to work it off, just gain more? “Oh, it’s just hormones.” I’ve wondered why so much of my hair comes out in the shower EVERY DAY. “Everyone sheds hair everyday.” Why was I suddenly suffering with depression? “Well, you have gone through a lot of trauma in your life.” Why do I grow hair where I shouldn’t? “Many women have facial hair, it’s pretty normal.” Why can I never fall asleep at night? “You’re not active enough during the day.”

Someone always had an answer to come back with for every question I ever asked so I eventually stopped asking. Until the other day. I didn’t ask the questions but I finally got the answer to them from her. “You have PCOS, you are the definition of it. How did no one talk to you about this before?”

I know what you are thinking, what on earth is PCOS? Well, it stands for Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and it is the leading cause of female infertility. There are over 200,000 cases in the US alone! And many women go undiagnosed, like I was.

Here are a list of symptoms found on the official website for PCOS:

Women with PCOS typically have irregular or missed periods as a result of not ovulating. Although some women may develop cysts on their ovaries, many women do not.

Other symptoms include:

  • Weight gain. About half of women with PCOS will have weight gain and obesity that is difficult to manage.
  • Fatigue. Many women with PCOS report increased fatigue and low energy. Related issues such as poor sleep may contribute to the feeling of fatigue.
  • Unwanted hair growth (also known as hirsutism). Areas affected by excess hair growth may include the face, arms, back, chest, thumbs, toes, and abdomen. Hirsutism  related to PCOS is due to hormonal changes in androgens.
  • Thinning hair on the head. Hair loss related to PCOS may increase in middle age.
  • Infertility. PCOS is a leading cause of female infertility. However, not every woman with PCOS is the same. Although some women may need the assistance of fertility treatments, others are able to conceive naturally.
  • Acne. Hormonal changes related to androgens can lead to acne problems. Other skin changes such as the development of skin tags and darkened patches of skin are also related to PCOS.
  • Mood changes. Having PCOS can increase the likelihood of mood swings, depression, and anxiety.
  • Pelvic pain. Pelvic pain may occur with periods, along with heavy bleeding. It may also occur when a woman isn’t bleeding.
  • Headaches. Hormonal changes prompt headaches.
  • Sleep problems. Women with PCOS often report problems such as insomnia or poor sleep. There are many factors that can affect sleep, but PCOS has been linked to a sleep disorder called sleep apnea.  With sleep apnea, a person will stop breathing for short periods of time during sleep.

As you can see, symptoms of PCOS are not pleasant. But that is exactly why women’s health care is so important. We need to help people with incurable ailments, such as this, as well as curable ones.

Though it isn’t curable, there are treatment options. Of course, the number one treatment is being place on birth control to stabilize your menstrual cycle. Often times, women get placed on metformin as well to help with various symptoms. I have not been placed on either. There is a pill that a doctor can give you if you haven’t menstruated in the last 90 days to cause you to menstruate so your body can clean itself out. This is what I will be taking if need be.

I know celebrities are a big part of our society so here is a small list of famous women who has struggled with PCOS:

  • Jillian Michaels

  • Emma Thompson

  • Victoria Beckham

  • Rebecca Atkinson

  • Jools Oliver

  • Sasha Pieterse

There is an entire month devoted to PCOS awareness, September. I wish I had known sooner that way I could participate but now I know for next month. But until then, if you see a teal ribbon anywhere, it’s for PCOS.

pcos-ribbon-md

         As always, thank you for reading my post and I hope this has helped you understand PCOS and how it can affect you. If you think you might have it, talk to your doctor right away.

Screen Shot 2017-10-18 at 5.48.04 AM